Three Eyewear Trends for 2017

MATERIALS, FIT & FASHION

Glasses Styles Come Back ‘Round For 2017

Today eyewear trends are a global phenomenon, driven by eyeglasses brands and influencers in art, fashion and design, with inspiration from the finest materials across the world. Our founder and eyewear designer, David Barton, for instance, often finds cues from art deco architecture in Los Angeles and details from Japanese collections of the late 70s to early 80s. Though difficult to pinpoint exactly where new trends in eyeglass frames start, today they are often advanced by stylish influencers in pop culture who drive adoption through images on TV, online and social media. You may also catch glimpses of the past in current glasses styles, as looks modernize with new shapes from year to year.

In 2017, in particular, style comes back ‘around’. This year, the trend continues to move toward round shapes, mixed materials, and metal and unisex styles, especially in women’s glasses.

1. Have I Seen You ‘Round Here?

round eyewear trends

Though not everyone can, or is ready to try them, round glasses are only getting more popular. While more conservative eyeglass wearers may think “Harry Potter,” this style is anything but geeky—just check out these frames worn by British Formula One Racer Lewis Hamilton; uber sexy “Blurred Lines” Model and Actress Emily Ratajkowski, Artist Daniel Arsham and Singer/Performer, Author, and Activist Alan Cumming for inspiration. Consider the Kodachi, Kodachi Windsor, Canton, Richmond, Hartford P3.

Reminiscent of President Truman and actor Gregory Peck, the P3 shape fits every eyeglass prescription and offers a more forgiving, flattering angle with a wider circumference at the top. As with other round glasses frames, it can be found with the keyhole bridge, for a unique expressive shape. For a classic look, always go with the keyhole. It’s more flattering, particularly with a more prominent nose. Sunglass clips, another great fashion statement, look great on round styles

Get started; try the round trend for yourself!

 

2. Go Retro

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Clubmaster Browline is another style, gracious to almost any face shape. These mixed material glasses derive their name from the bold upper part of the frames as they outline the brows. They initially became popular in the 1950s and 60s and experienced a renaissance in the 80s with Browline sunglasses, and in the 2010s with the rise of retro style and the hipster subculture.

We are inspired by wearers like Actress and Comedian Ali Wong. Also see our Katana – very much like those worn by Rupert Evan’s character in The Man in the High Castle. New Browline options bring in subtle yet contemporary differences in shape, color and detail. They offer a more current angular profile over softer, shallower true vintage styles of the past that were less form-fitted and often more upswept (cat-eye’ish) than modern versions today.

3. Wireframe, Tortoise Mixed Materials & Au Natural Eyewear Trends

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While black never truly goes out of style, and clear can still be a great option, these materials are being replaced by metal and mixed variations. Natural tones, tortoise shell—particularly interesting versions, like Aberdeen or Tokyo Tortoise—and thin metal, wireframes are on trend for 2017. In particular, mixing styles, where the top might be tortoise and the lower half metal–or the bridge and temples are metal and eye rim is acetate–are right on point. Consider mixed material square shapes like the Roman and Katana.

Want to capitalize on these trends, while maintaining a classic look that won’t leave you in style one minute and out the next? Consider these tips from Barton.

Check out the new mixed materials frames for yourself.

 

Don’t Be Afraid to Experiment a Little

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While popular generalities suggest round frames are better for square faces and vice versa, Barton suggests there are more exceptions than rules when it comes to face shape. Lens size, bridge fit, frame color–have as much, or more, to do with how a frame looks. And often it’s the size of a frame that’s more important than the shape. If you have a round face, try a smaller round frame and avoid a large round.

Remember that glasses are an important style accessory that is on your face most of the time – so maybe it’s better to not have just one pair anyway. You would not have only one suit or one dress – so why only one pair of glasses? Maybe it’s time to experiment with different styles for different occasions or with different outfits.

Classic Styles, Quality Fit & Construction Go a Long Way

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While lens shapes are very trend-driven, brands quickly interpret them for every price point, from high to low, in the marketplace. Typically, the greater the price, the more the focus on quality and refined details.
You can certainly get the look of a P3 for a low price but you won’t get the quality. Low end versions might be injection molded versus handmade; made of painted tortoise with highlights that clash with skin tones versus flatter, or scuff or peel—details that easily become apparent in person and over time.

With optical less likely than sunglasses to follow fleeting trends, consider your glasses an investment piece over fast fashion brands less likely to hold their shape over a season or two. A high quality, “tailored” fitting pair of glasses will last for years (especially with the 10-year warranty and refurbished program at David Kind).

Updating Is Still Important

Though style recycles itself and comes back around, prescription eyewear usually changes in 5 and 10 year cycles. You can see trends coming and going. And, Barton suggests, if you ever see something come out of nowhere, it will usually be gone before you know it as well. Remember Sarah Palin’s glasses? Everyone wanted them in 2008…by 2009, not so much!

Look to classic styles with contemporary features. If you choose a round (such as the Kodachi or Richmond) or a deep square shape (such as the Katana), then you do not need to worry about going out of style any time soon. Shallow rectangular shapes may more quickly look dated.

Don’t Forget Protection/Everyone Loves a Good Complement

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Sunglass clips are a great way for optical wearers to protect eyes from vicious rays and get a very on-trend sunglass look. Or consider turning any pair of deep square or round shaped frames into prescription sunglasses. Make sure the frame lens outer edges extend to the full width of your face; fit is important. A tailored fit never goes out of style. Contact our opticians for help and see examples here.

Ready to update your look?

Try our most popular Clover, Richmond, and Roman frames (and 3 others of your choosing, or our opticians’ recommendation), for 6 days with no obligation to purchase.

 

GET STARTED NOW!

 

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  1. Reading this has made me want to change up this year in glasses. I think I’m going to go with the round shape. One of the main reasons would be you can get clip on sunglasses. I have always been drawn to small rectangular style which I still have not found a clip on!! The fact that there are a lot of different styles to choose from makes it fun to look like a new person whenever you want!! Thank you for the info!!

  2. Cindy says:

    I really would like to see frames from the late 70’s to late 90’s come back. Those were the nicest (of course I exclude those flashy styles which all years have no matter what is in style at the time). I like the gold metal frames and tortoiseshell metal frames with the more oval round styles. I am tired of this retro 50’s look that has been around for a few years and bombarding all the optical shops. All these frames do is cover your whole face making you look unattractive especially with the arms starting at a high position and none are even light-coloured. All seem to be this heavy dark color plastic with square shapes.
    Once this goes, I hope it never comes back.

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